Saturday, July 14, 2012

Color vs Value Give-Away

COLOR     VS     VALUE

Original
Do-over

I have received a bunch of e-mails  and comments about my stitchery coffee cups.  I have often struggled with contrast and lots of you told me you have the same issue. It brought back a memory of a saying that another quilter told me once.  I don't remember who it was and I don't think she invented it, but this is the saying:

"Value does all the work, but color gets the credit."

 Lots of you also gave me suggestions about how to avoid the low contrast - can't see the difference problem.  And it is all about value.

Other then using a design wall, one of the most popular suggestions was the use of a red tinted viewer. I checked around and the one that is the most commercially available is the Ruby Beholder. It was \made for value comparison.


It's made of plastic and That Patchwork Place markets and sells it.  You can find it here:
I was pleasantly surprised to find out that it is sold by my publisher, so I thought I would ask them for 1 to give away.


Do-Over
        
Original



Now this is what happened when I used this gadget with my blocks.  The value of the threads in my original block was just too similar to the background fabric.  In the Do-over block, the values are different enough that  most of the thread shows up.

I'd like to share this tool.  You'll have fun with it. It will minimize those value mistakes.  Become a follower, if you are not one already, and leave a comment letting me know either your solution to value or how you would use the Ruby Beholder.  I'll pick a winner on Monday, July 16th.
 (Make sure there is an e-mail address in your comment and you are not  no-reply blogger.)

And if you missed the free pattern for the coffee cup, click HERE.

28 comments:

  1. Ive had a ruby beholder for about 18 years. They are great! Dont enter me in the drawing!

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  2. I guess "trial and error" is how I deal with value ;>) This tool looks like it would be so useful; I've never heard of it before but am amazed by what it reveals in your pics above. Thanks for chance to win! (EMAIL: marshudson at comcast dot net)

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  3. I guess "trial and error" is how I deal with value ;>) This tool looks so useful although I've never heard of it before. It's amazing what it reveals in your pics above. Thanks for chance to win! (EMAIL: marshudson at comcast dot net)

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  4. I guess "trial and error" is how I deal with value ;>) This tool looks like it would be so useful; I've never heard of it before but am amazed by what it reveals in your pics above. Thanks for chance to win! (EMAIL: marshudson at comcast dot net)

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  5. I just had a horrible time with a Convergence quilt. Value was all off. And then my applique went bad so the project died. I really could use one for these Convergence quilts I am working on. I love the crazy backgrounds but am having trouble working out the colors for the applique that I want to do. I follow. I was WAY behind and not reading anyones blogs but now I am going to attempt to read them nightly :)

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  6. I have never heard of the Ruby Beholder before, but, WOW! What a great gadget! I have trouble with value too-- always am unsure which fabric to choose... This little handy tool would be very helpful! Thank you for the chance to win one!! I love your embroidered coffee mug-- so pretty and colorful!

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  7. Oh my, what a difference that thing makes! I struggle with contrast as well, and I usually solve my problem with, "honey, which one looks better?" It doesn't help that I cannot tell the difference between green and brown, either. If Honey's not available, I usually try to go with light thread on dark fabric, or dark thread on light fabric and cross my fingers. Sometimes even that doesn't work, so I resort to Jack the Ripper.

    I do a lot of machine embroidery, and I bet this puppy would make things a lot easier!

    Thanks for thinking of us!!

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  8. I've never heard of a ruby beholder! What a clever gadget! I can see all sorts of uses

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  9. looks like a tool that I could use!

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  10. I have to be honest...I squint a lot. That gadget would help my eyesight.

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  11. To check for value contrast another tip is to "blur your eyes," meaning to step back and slightly squint. This helps when I can't find the Ruby Beholder.
    Martha
    http://www.marthaginn.blogspot.com

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  12. sellison18@gmail.comJuly 15, 2012 at 9:53 AM

    I'd love to win the Ruby Beholder.

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  13. I am a very happy follower of yours. I never really realized how color and value affected the way your blocks look until this post. I have a horrible time trying to coordinate colors and patterns for quilts. I would love to be able to use this and learn.

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  14. I photo copy my project in gray scale -- that seems to help me out in determining if I have a good selection of values.
    Love your work, as always! And I really enjoyed hearing about your life as a cyclist! How fun and exciting!

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  15. Please don't enter me for the Ruby Beholder, as I've had one forever. Since I'm naturally a high contrast person in preference, I rarely have trouble with trying to avoid low contrast. BUT, having said that, there are those rare occasions that I am not sure. I can, and do, use the RB, but sometimes they are too close to tell. Then it occurred to me that if they're too close to call with the RB and I'm not choosing blending colors, then they are too low contrast for each other.

    Another couple of things that I do...first, I hang the fabrics and/or threads over top them on my design wall and walk as far from it as I can. If I can't see them clearly against each other, I change them out until I can see them easily. Afterward...I will hang them up and walk as far away as I can and take a photo, and then one fairly close up. When I download the photos to iPhoto and look at the thumbnail of the photos on my desktop after exporting them there, I should be able to see the colors of everything perfectly WITHOUT opening the photo. If not, I continue to change what isn't working until I do.

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  16. Found out about your giveaway from the quiltart list - thanks for the chance to win!

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  17. I missed the explanation of the "red viewer" on the first sending/reading of your mini-tutorial. I'm glad to be enlightened, and happy to put my name in the hat for a "red viewer". LDL

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  18. Sure wish I had heard about this gadget a month ago! I made a paper pieced gardening gloves block with fabric that was too similar to the background, and totally lost the outline of the gloves! Thanks for the chance to win this!

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  19. My guess is that red cellophane would work as well. Give it a try. Or those red kids glasses made of cardboard for three D viewing.

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  20. It looks like a super tool! I generally make color judgments by eye alone, but it would be nice to "see" what I am doing in a different way.

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  21. It looks like a super tool! I generally make color judgments by eye alone, but it would be nice to "see" them differently, as well.

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  22. That is very interesting.. I'm sure I have had he same problem and maybe never knew it..thanks for the tip...

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  23. that's my birthstone color, named my last car Ruby, Ruby!,
    it's smaller than file folder parts,
    and it fits nicely into an envelope, should i win.
    thanks for turning that great tip up again!

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  24. I think I missed the give away but your blog Is great. I adore your coffee cup. I also do Chuppas ( wonder how many people know what they are).

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  25. I can't figure out how to publish. My third comment:). I think I missed the giveaway but your blog is greats, the coffee cup is Adorable. Chuppas ...well I've made a few and yours is beautiful. Wonder how many people know what the are?

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  26. One of those art school lessons that the rest of absorb somewhere along the way. I heard Susan McKelvey say that. She is a color genius.

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  27. i had no idea what a ruby beholder was for ... it looks easier to use than taking a picture and using the camera's grey scale to check on the light and dark values.

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  28. Up until now, I have just squinted at my patches of fabric. It has helped me with choosing the right shade of linen fabric to show off my embroidery floss colors. Ruby beholder--now that is a tool I could use!

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