Thursday, September 15, 2016

Hello Long Island!

I grew up on Long Island and had a very nice upbringing. This is a current photo of my house that I snagged from Zillow. It has certainly been updated.

North Woodmere is located on the south shore, pretty close to NYC. Many people took the LIRR ( Long Island Railroad) to work in the city. My friends and I often took it to hang out there. Very rarely did I head to the eastern end of Long Island. The properties were either potato farms or summer communities. I left for college when I was 16, and during that time my parents sold the house and moved to a retirement community in NJ!

I was looking forward to head back to LI to visit the Eastern Long Island Quilters Guild (ELIQG) and check out the East End, as they call it. Wow! It was so bucolic. I stayed with a friend of mine, who was also in charge of programs.

The first night I arrived, we went into this sweet little town of Port Jefferson, right on th LI Sound. You can catch a ferry boat to a couple of different places in CT.

I just loved this tugboat.

Roberta's husband is quite knowledgable about boats, so we had a nice tour of the harbor.

My friend, Roberta, has started a business as a vendor at quilt shows. She has set up one of her bedrooms as a shop. It was located right across from the room I was staying in.

Can you see the drool dripping down my chin? She had just received fabric from the latest Tula Pink collection. I had to buy some plus a bit more.

I'm glad I don't sleepwalk. She also sells on line at www.ohsewsally.com. She carries lots of Kaffe fabrics, as well as Glorious Hexagons paper piecing packages.

As we drove to the workshop on Wednesday morning, heading east, there were many vineyards and farmstands. It was too early in the morning to stop, but I couldn't resist this photo op.

 

They chose the silk Curvalicious workshop. I love this workshop because the ladies get pretty far into the project, learn lots about working with silk and Curvalicious. It is a very ironing intensive workshop and Oops! We blew the circuit. Those little irons pull a lot of current. This led to very creative ironing stations, wherever we could find outlets not on the same circuit.

 

 

At the end of the day, here's our group! Nice job.

 

Monday, September 12, 2016

Cuba? Can't Wait!

Tomorrow I am heading out to Long Island, NY, place of my birth. Well, not exactly where I am going. I will be able to wave to my town as I drive almost all of the way to the end of the island, Rocky Point. I'm visiting the Eastern Long Island Quilt Guild for a Curvalicious workshop and then to share my silk quilts in the evening.

I'll be gone three days and then I'll have a one day turn around to cuddle with my puppy before we head to Cuba. I am so excited about this trip. I can't wait to see the architecture, the old cars and of course the cement tiles. You know how I lived turning the Mexican tiles into quilts from my book !Quilt Fiesta!

I'm not sure I'll be able to post any photos while I'm gone because I'm not sure there will be internet.

When I return home, I will be working on my second newsletter and will share some photos from Cuba. Also, I will include a video for the construction of my folding fiber book from Holland. It was a bike and barge trip in the land of windmills and tulips.

Lots of people have asked me how I construct these books. I videoed a 6 part class where I share how I create each page and then how I put them all together. Plus, there will be another recipe from Don's Kitchen and more quilty goodness. If you need to sign up for my newsletter, click HERE. I'd love to have you join me on my journey.

 

Thursday, September 8, 2016

A Secret Swap

I have had so much fun participating in a swap on Instagram. Here's my quilt that I'm sending to my secret swapmate. I can't tell you her name or where she's from,because it's a surprise.

The swap was announced on Instagram and the basis was paper pieced patterns designed by #quietplay. Paper piecing has had a resurgence. It's a technique where fabric is stitched into a paper foundation. About 8-10 years ago, it was brought to popularity by Carol Doak and was used to get perfect points when piecing such motifs as stars. It has also been used to achieve very intricate pieced patterns. Lately, it has become the rage with some young ,odeon quilters. The detail is amazing and there are lots of pieces. You can see #quietplay's patterns at www.quietplay.blogspot.com. She says that her most popular pattern is the Geometric Sewing Machine. Isn't it cool?

There were 305 people that signed up for the swap. We each filled out a questionnaire with some choices for a pattern, our favorite colors and fabric choice and if there was anything we really didn't like. The swap organizer then assigned us a swapmate, and we were split into manageable size groups. My group was #qpteamamerica4 (Quiet Play Team America 4). The person I was making a mini quilt for, was not who was making a quilt for me. From the options my swapmate gave me, I chose to make the Geometric Elephant.

It was a downloadable PDF pattern. What's cool about this, is that you print it yourself anywhere in the world. There's no shipping charge and if you want it immediately at midnight, you can have it. Now that's immediate gratification.

My swapmate also gave some fabric choices. I chose pink.

As the making of the swap progressed, I posted photos to our IG group and said "Swapmate, what do you think?" Of course my swapmate didn't know it was for her, so I would receive lots of comments from the group as to whether they liked it or not. I looked for my swapmate's answer to guide me through my choices, because I want her to love her quilt.

There were a lot of sections and some of them had tiny pieces.

I couldn't wait until the elephant came together.

This was the point where I became uncertain as to the taste of my swapmate. Would she like the quilt simple as above or with a pieced border?

I loved the triangle border, but the quilt wasn't for me. I posted both the simple quilt and the tricked out quilt on IG and kept my fingers crossed that she would reply.

There were lots of comments. Some liked the plain and some liked the triangle border. I waited and kept my fingers crossed that my swapmate would leave a comment. These borders made a big difference. Finally, she commented and I was so happy that she liked the pieced border. Yay!

I used a paper foundation that I designed to piece the border and I loved using the wonder clips to hold it in place while stitching instead of pins.

The swap deadline isn't for a few weeks, so I'll have to wait to ship it out, and I can't wait to receive my quilt. I'll share it when it arrives, but honestly, I have had so much fun making the Pink Elephant.

If you want to follow me on IG, I'm @oyveyquilts. Maybe we'll end up being in a swap together one day.

 

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Has This Ever Happened To You?

Here is the same Mini Mosaic quilt with 2 different borders.

The one on the left was made first. I put the borders on, stitched the binding to the front and then hand stitched it to the back. I thought I was done. Another Mini Mosaic quilt for my collection. It reminded me so much of Key West. I hung it on my design wall the next day and .....

Decided that the border just didn't work for me. It was too matchy matchy with the flamingo and really detracted from the main subject. I was unhappy. How could I have gone wrong? Should I just leave it with the peachy border and move on to the next one?

Has this happened to you? Where you thought you were done and realized, it just wasn't working for you? It wasn't what you had envisioned? Is it time to rip?

It was for me. I removed the binding, iand then the borders. It was a small quilt after all. Then I auditioned other fabrics and thanks to the advice of some friends, chose a green batik.

It kept the tropical feel that I wanted while still letting the flamingo be the star. Now to move onto my next Mini Mosauc quilt. I just love making them.

On another note, I just sent out my first monthly newsletter. If you're not on my mailing list and you didn't receive it, you may want to take a look. I was so happy with all the positive feedback that I received. It has some great content including a video tour of my studio, a very cool app to transform photos and a company worthy recipe from Don' s Kitchen. If you want to check it out click HERE. And if you like it, I hope you'll subscribe. You can do it on the right side bar of this blog. If you have trouble subscribing, just e-mail me.

 

Friday, August 26, 2016

Quilts Tell A Story

This was the view as we drove into Washington DC to visit the relatively new location of the Textile Museum.

The museum used to be located on Embassy Row and it was tiny, but became part of George Washington University and now has a beautiful new home.

 

I heard about an exhibit a couple of months ago, called "Stories of Migration: Contemporary Artists Interpret Diaspora". I originally heard the word diaspora in relation to the Jews. I wasn't really sure what it meant, but the pieces in this exhibit explained it so clearly. I would use the word dispersion as a synonym. The dispersion of ethnic groups can be voluntary or involuntary. This was the basis of the story that each of these fiber prices told.

The interpretation of this theme by 44 textile artists was amazing. I expected to see 2 dimensional quilts hanging on the walls. Instead it was fiber art represented as quilts, sculptures, video and even a piece that was hanging from the ceiling. Honestly I was curious as to how these pieces were delivered to the museum.

Interestingly, we were listening to NPR on the way to DC and there was a broadcast about the National Park Service and the making of one of the Japanese internment camps, Manazar, into a National Historic site. One of the first pieces I saw was about the Japanese children being sent to one of these camps during WWII.

Following are a bunch of photos I took of the diverse pieces along with the artist's statements that I thought were so very thought provoking, far ranging and diverse.

 

 

 

There was also a patriotic textile exhibit. Did you know that it wasn't until 1840 that politicical campaigns were coordinated on a national level? They started to use promotional textile material such as bandanas and flags. William Henry Harrison had a 10 foot ball covered with campaign material that would be rolled from town to town - "let's keep the ball rolling".

There is not much time left to see the Diaspora exhibit. It closes September 4th. I will definitely watch for the upcoming visits at this museum. They seem to be able to combine history and textiles in such an interesting way. Click HERE if you'd like to visit their website.

 

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Good Bye?

It's so hard to throw away fabric and books and magazines. Does it make it any easier to donate it or give it away? When do you have too much stuff? Like most quilters, I have enough fabric to last me for the rest of my life. There is a saying, "whoever dies with the most fabric wins". There are lots of other sayings, but I'm sure you've heard lots of them.

I knew it was time to destash when I bought a longarm quilting machine. We had to empty and remove 3 bookshelves that were full. The bookshelves were used to close off the dinngroom from the living room. This is what it looked like when the shelves were removed.

Then I had to find a place for everything and that's when I became ruthless when it came time to decide what to keep and what to let go. This is my foyer with my donations.

I am donating a lot of my magazines and some books to my quilt guild. I do have a bunch of magazines that have my Chanukah patterns or quilts in them. I thought there might be some quilters who would want the Chanukah patterns, so I am offering them for the cost of shipping. If you want one or more, email me and I will send you a PayPal invoice for the shipping cost. I will need your address.

I have 5 of these from McCalls Quilting, 2009

And this is the pattern.

I have 3 of these Quick Quilts, 2008

With a pattern for this:

I have just one of this 2009 Quivk Quilts

 

With this pattern

One Quilt Life, 2013

 

With my Frosty Flake pattern

The Love of Quilting, 2009

Has an article about my quilt, Willoway

2 copies of Quilting Arts

 

With an article about My Motherhood quilt - 2 copies (sorry it's sideways)

2 copies of QNM

Also with my Motherhood quilt

And finally, one copy of The Quilt Life

With an article about my Mexican tile hilts and a pattern for

They are all FREE!! Yes FREE! You just need to pay for shipping. I will ship anywhere n the world. As soon as you email me and let me know your email, which copy (copies) that you want, the cost of shipping will be determined and you will be sent a PayPal invoice.

So please take advantage of my de stashing and help me to not have any regrets!